Kings forwards, QUALCOMP and plus/minus numbers

QUALCOMP – Kings Forwards (who faces the toughest opponents):

  1. Parse
  2. Kopitar
  3. Smyth
  4. Richardson
  5. Brown
  6. Purcell
  7. Ivanans
  8. Stoll
  9. Williams
  10. Simmonds
  11. Frolov
  12. Handzus
  13. Lewis
  14. Moller

Notice that the Handzus line is still facing the weakest competition, counter-intuitive if you believe they are really our checking line (I don’t). Toughest assignments are going to the #1 unit. The Stoll/Purcell line is right in the middle, as they have been all year (except for the first couple of games, where they were at the top of the list).

Here are the numbers for GAON/60 (Goals Against a player is on the ice for, per 60 minutes of icetime):

  1. Moller 0.00
  2. Simmonds 0.73
  3. Purcell 1.49
  4. Stoll 1.78
  5. Handzus 1.96
  6. Williams 2.15
  7. Ivanans 2.40
  8. Frolov 2.43
  9. Kopitar 2.57
  10. Richardson 2.68
  11. Smyth 2.85
  12. Brown 2.89
  13. Lewis 4.23
  14. Parse 5.19

Notice that Simmonds, Purcell, Stoll and Handzus have the best defensive numbers here. I cite this to counter people who don’t understand what Purcell is doing right this year. Now, here’s +/-ON/60 (which is plus/minus per 60 minutes):

  1. Kopitar 2.20
  2. Williams 2.15
  3. Simmonds 1.82
  4. Smyth 1.78
  5. Purcell 1.49
  6. Stoll 0.89
  7. Handzus 0.39
  8. Moller 0.00
  9. Parse 0.00
  10. Frolov -0.40
  11. Ivanans -2.40
  12. Richardson -2.68
  13. Lewis -4.23

Again, I notice how high Purcell is on this list. Parse’s numbers are dead even, despite the above-mentioned high GA/60. He got screwed on a couple of those goals against, so I have to think these numbers are very good for him. Frolov’s numbers are not good, but they were much much worse before the benching, so that’s also a net (very) positive. I believe, since he sat, Frolov’s numbers have come up +2, which is a big change for a handful (2?) games.

 
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