That Was One of the Best Losses I Have Ever Seen

And here’s why:

1) I watched the TSN feed. Those guys were effusive in their praise of the Kings in general and of Doughty specifically. There was a great moment when the play-by-play guy said, “Doughty [does something with the puck, I forget what], Nystrom tracks him.” And the color guy muttered, “good luck!”

2) Related to that: Doughty shifted into some extra gears I didn’t know he had. He very nearly took over the game. Even though he didn’t score, it was breathtaking.

3) Giordano clocked Brown twice. It was clear that there would be a response (I mean, besides Raitis granting Calgary a power-play right after the second hit). As soon as that happened, I thought, “too bad Johnson, Simmonds, Stoll, Jones and Segal are not here.” So, who steps up in defense of Brown? Who sends the message?

OSCAR MOLLER.

Moller himself took two or three very hard but clean checks over the course of the game, but the announcers were quick to point out that (a) Moller always made the play, took the hit, got the puck where it was supposed to go, (b) he knows how to take a hit, and (c) he goes right back to the dirty areas. This is exactly what I’ve been saying about Moller for two years now. He can dish it, he can take it, and he’s fearless. (He led the team last night with 2 hits; Brown was credited with three, but I don’t count the one where he almost paralyzed himself face first into the boards.

4) The Elkins goal. First thing, Elkins gets the puck deep and — does what? hang around the half-wall? loiter in the high slot? — no: HE DRIVES TO THE NET. With two guys on him. Second thing, Moller digs the puck out from about 450 pounds of Calgary Flames, gets hauled down, and while falling to the ice makes a perfect pass to the guy who drove to the net, with two guys on him.

5) The celebration of the Elkins goal. Moller attacked Elkins he was so happy. So was I. That was great.

By the way, I don’t think the clock started when the puck dropped on that first Calgary goal. But whatever. Kings lose and drop down to ten games above .500.

 
  • Mike

    Let’s not start enjoying losses, ok?

    • DougS

      I understand what Quisp is getting at. Your opponent always has a say in what happens in sports, and so does luck. It’s entirely possible to put out a brilliant effort and still lose.

      Also, the things that he’s pointing out are harbingers of a bright future, even if they didn’t produce a win tonight.

    • quisp

      The loss is merely the outcome. It’s not the whole game. If Frolov hits that shot, it’s a tie with a chance at a win. The fact of whether he hits that shot or not doesn’t change everything that went before it. Obviously, winning is good and losing is not. But the things I mentioned are important. To me, anyway.

  • falmer

    i like this observation, and it clearly echoes TM’s comments after the contest. win or lose, it’s how you play the game. without a doubt this was one of their best losses of the season. touching on quisp’s point about the TSN broadcast, i don’t know if i’ve ever been so thrilled watching/listening to a canadian call of a Kings game. these guys were sharp, fair and sincerely excited at what they were seeing in our team. they called it like it was. their analysis of Kopi’s play throughout the game was nearly obsessive. i especially appreciated how they stressed that he’s still learning and still has potential to develop lots of little details in his game (and they backed it all up with examples). that’s what great announcing does: takes a good game and makes it even better.

    and props to giordano for playing like a beast by taking aim at our most physical player. to me, he was the player of the game. would love to see more of that fearless, effective physical attack from some of our guys. maybe they can learn a thing or two from his example last night. wow.

    anyway, here we come!

  • sullyfan

    Agreed!

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